Our Team

At the Children’s Data Network, our team consists of people who enjoy work as both “poets and plumbers”. We possess a shared vision of advancing the science of children’s services through a more rigorous use of existing data. Yet vision requires action and implementation. We are committed to the development of the relationships and infrastructure needed to realize the potential of data to improve outcomes for children.

Staff

Emily Putnam-Hornstein

Emily Putnam-Hornstein

Emily Putnam-Hornstein, PhD

Emily is an Associate Professor at USC’s School of Social Work and Director of the Children’s Data Network. She also maintains a research appointment at the California Child Welfare Indicators Project. Emily’s current research focuses on the application of epidemiological methods to improve the surveillance of non-fatal and fatal child abuse and neglect. Her analysis of large-scale, linked administrative data has provided insight into where scarce resources may be most effectively targeted and informs understanding of maltreated children within a broader, population-based context. Her research has been funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, HF Guggenheim Foundation, First 5 LA, and HRSA’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Emily graduated from Yale University with a BA in Psychology, received her MSW from Columbia University, and earned her PhD in Social Welfare from the University of California at Berkeley.

Jacquelyn McCroskey

Jacquelyn McCroskey

Jacquelyn McCroskey, DSW

Jacquelyn is a core team member responsible for creating the Children’s Data Network and currently serves as Co-Director. She holds the John Milner Professorship of Child Welfare at USC’s School of Social Work. Her research focuses on financing and organization of services for children and families, utilization of results and performance measurement, and the efficiency and effectiveness of services. She draws upon both qualitative and quantitative methods to inform policy and guide improvements to government systems providing child welfare, juvenile justice, and early care and education services. Currently, McCroskey co-leads the multi-university child welfare evaluation team funded by Casey Family Programs to support the Los Angeles Department of Children and Family Services in understanding the impact of a variety of community-based service initiatives, including the DCFS Family Preservation Program and Prevention Initiative Demonstration Project. She also leads a cross-disciplinary research roundtable of researchers from USC, UCLA and Cal State LA in the Los Angeles County Probation Data Project funded by the Keck Foundation under the auspices of the Advancement Project. Through earlier efforts she helped to create the Family Assessment Form, working with the Children’s Bureau of Southern California to develop, test and disseminate a practice-based assessment instrument now used in child and family service settings across the country and abroad. Through her work with county, city and school district policy makers and philanthropists, she has investigated inter-agency collaboration and community partnerships across a broad range of organizations, service areas and settings. Jacquelyn received her DSW from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Regan Foust

Regan Foust

Regan Foust, PhD

Regan Foust is the Director of Strategic Partnerships and a Research Scientist at the Children’s Data Network. She directs organizational research; stewards data, research and funding partnerships; and helps agencies improve programs and services for children and families in California. Formerly, as Senior Manager, Data and Research for the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, she ensured the quality and usefulness of the content of kidsdata.org, a public use data site focused on child health and well-being; guided the development and implementation of initiatives to ensure that the Foundation’s data and information are used to improve the health and well-being of children in California; and called attention to key issues facing children in California by liberating informative data sets, advocating for open data, and stewarding strategic data and communication partnerships. Prior to joining the Foundation, she worked to bridge the gap between research and practice in the social sciences at a research and development firm, and to evaluate and improve programs at a child welfare agency. Dr. Foust holds a doctorate in Educational Psychology from the University of Virginia and a B.A. in Psychology from U.C. Davis.

Jonathan Hoonhout

Jonathan Hoonhout

Jonathan Hoonhout, BFA

Jonathan Hoonhout serves as Project Director of the Children’s Data Network. His research interests include child welfare, homeless youth, single parenting, and LGBTQ youth outcomes. From 2009 to 2011, Jonathan served as the Grants Director and Company Manager of the Washington Ensemble Theatre. His responsibilities included proposal design, project oversight and serving as liaison between various interest groups for the company. Jonathan received his BFA in Theater from Cornish College of the Arts.

Tanya Gupta

Tanya Gupta

Tanya Gupta, MS

Tanya is the Research Programmer and Database Specialist at the Children's Data Network. Her focus areas of interest lie in Big Data Analytics and Machine Learning. She has studied Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Data Mining, Database Systems and comes with prior work experience in Natural Language Processing applications. Tanya graduated with her Bachelors in Computer Engineering from Delhi College of Engineering at University of Delhi and earned her Masters in Computer Science from University of Southern California.

Huy Nghiem

Huy Nghiem

Huy Nghiem, MS

Huy Nghiem is the Research Programmer at Children’s Data Network. He participates in research projects by developing programs for large and complex data from various sources. He functions as liaison between scientists and IT analysts to design and enhance systems to satisfy research specifications. Huy has had experience in data analytics and administrative procedures in various fields of healthcare. He holds dual Bachelor degrees in Applied Mathematics and Public Health Sciences from University of California, Irvine and a Master degree in Software Engineering from the California State University, Fullerton.

Siddharth Raj

Siddharth Raj

Siddharth Raj, BS

Siddharth Raj is a Systems Administrator at Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work at USC and specializes in virtualization and infrastructure design. He received his BS degree from Cal State, San Bernardino with almost twenty years of technology experience. Siddharth designed the IT architecture of the dedicated infrastructure that supports the Children’s Data Network. Also a full time ninja!

Stephanie Cuccaro-Alamin

Stephanie Cuccaro-Alamin

Stephanie Cuccaro-Alamin, PhD

Stephanie is a Research Associate at the Children’s Data Network. She also holds a part-time appointment as a Research Associate at the California Child Welfare Indicators Project at UC Berkeley. Her research interests include child welfare services, poverty, and the use of linked administrative data for program evaluation and policy research. Dr. Cuccaro-Alamin has extensive experience linking statewide administrative data for research purposes. Past linkages have included vital statistics records, public assistance data, wage data, and child welfare data. Most recently her work has focused on linking child welfare and wage data to examine long-term employment outcomes for youth exiting foster care.

Barbara Needell

Barbara	Needell

Barbara Needell, PhD

Barbara is a data outreach and engagement consultant for the CDN and the retired principal investigator of the California Child Welfare Indicators Project (CCWIP) at UC Berkeley. For more than a decade, Barbara led CCWIP’s ongoing collaborations with state and county colleagues to produce and publicly disseminate the data used to support the California Child Welfare Outcomes and Accountability System. She is a former member of California’s Child Welfare Council and former co-chair of the Data Linkage and Information Sharing Committee. In addition to her work for the CDN, Barbara continues to consult nationally with child welfare agencies.

Michael N. Mitchell

Michael N. Mitchell

Michael N. Mitchell, PhD

Michael is a Statistical Advisor for the Children’s Data Network and a Senior Statistician at the Veterans Administration, working on multiple research projects focused on sleep research. This research helps Veterans to improve their quality of sleep as well as improving our knowledge about effective treatments for poor sleep quality. He is actively involved in every phase of these research projects -- research design, grant writing, data cleaning, data preparation, statistical analysis, interpretation of results, and writing of manuscripts. Previously, he worked for 12 years as a statistical consultant and manager of the UCLA ATS statistical consulting group, where he envisioned, designed and contributed to the UCLA Statistical Consulting Resources website. He is the author of three books -- A Visual Guide to Stata Graphics, Data Management Using Stata: A Practical Handbook, and Interpreting and Visualizing Regression Models using Stata. He is working on his fourth book, Stata for the Behavioral Sciences due for release in 2015.

Ivy Hammond

Ivy Hammond

Ivy Hammond, MSW

Ivy is a Research Assistant at the Children’s Data Network and also works as an Emergency Response Children’s Social Worker for Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services. Her research interests include infant and LGBTQ youth outcomes. Previously, she worked as a parent-infant educator and preschool teacher. Ivy received her MSW from the University of Southern California and her BA from Sarah Lawrence College.

Fellows & Students

John Prindle

John Prindle

John Prindle, PhD

John is a postdoctoral research fellow with the Children's Data Network. His research focuses on longitudinal and predictive modeling of the impacts of maltreatment on child and family services, and on child development. Prior to working with the CDN, John developed theory guided exploration methods to combine structural modeling and data-mining techniques to examine covariance structure heterogeneity. He is also interested in models of growth and change, measurement models, and studying the impact of incomplete data in biasing statistical tests. John graduated from the University of California, San Diego with BS/BA degrees in Psychology and Economics, and from the University of Southern California with a PhD in Psychology.

Andrea Lane Eastman

Andrea Lane Eastman

Andrea Lane Eastman, MA

Andrea is a doctoral student at USC's School of Social Work and works as a student research assistant at the Children's Data Network. Her research interests include child welfare, juvenile justice, children of incarcerated parents, homeless youth, and policy and advocacy analysis. From 2008 - 2013, Andrea worked as a legislative aide and committee consultant for California State Senator Carol Liu. Her responsibilities included drafting legislation related to human services, early education, and public safety. In addition to advising the Senator and developing legislation related to women, children, and families, she staffed the Select Committee on Women and Children in the Criminal Justice System. In 2010, she became Project Manager for the Senator’s Pathways to Wellbeing and Economic Prosperity program (Pathways), a collaborative effort among service providers, advocates, researchers, and stakeholders to coordinate the delivery of services and promote policies and programs that benefit populations at risk. Prior to her legislative work, Andrea Lane worked as a trauma therapist trainee and treated clients that had been victims or perpetrators of sexual abuse, child abuse, and domestic violence while earning a Master’s in Marriage and Family Therapy from Pepperdine University.

Lindsey Palmer

Lindsey Palmer

Lindsey Palmer, MSW

Lindsey is a doctoral student at USC's School of Social Work and works as a research assistant for the Children's Data Network. Her research interests include juvenile justice, child welfare, and pregnant/parenting adolescents. Previously, she worked as a clinical social worker with pregnant/parenting foster and probation youth. Lindsey received her master’s in social work from USC and completed her bachelor’s in Nutritional Science and Psychology from California Polytechnic State University.

Gauri Kolhatkar

Gauri Kolhatkar

Gauri Kolhatkar, MD, MPH, MS

Gauri is a pediatrician who has cared for patients in a variety of settings over the past decade, including children’s hospitals, academic medical centers, federally qualified health centers and the Indian Health Service. She currently practices within the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, serving families involved in the child welfare system. Her interests are in health systems redesign aimed at population and life course health, with a specific emphasis on equity and child maltreatment prevention. Using CDN’s linked administrative records, she is examining child welfare system involvement among children born in California who are referred to early intervention services for developmental concerns. Gauri graduated from Stanford University with Honors in Human Biology, and obtained her MD and MPH from Northwestern University, where she was also the recipient of an Albert Schweitzer fellowship. She has an MS in Health Policy and Management from UCLA. She completed her residency and chief residency at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, her fellowship in Child Abuse Pediatrics at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, and her fellowship in health services research at UCLA through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program.

Chelsea Lee

Chelsea Lee

Chelsea Lee

Chelsea Lee is an undergraduate assistant for the Children's Data Network. Her interests include epidemiology and Big Data analytics in healthcare, particularly in extracting insights to inform public policy. She is currently majoring in Applied and Computational Mathematics (B.S.) and minoring in Public Health at USC. On campus, she is the VP of Events for Applied Statistics Club and Math Coordinator of Teach for Los Angeles.

Researchers

Mia Bird

Mia Bird

Mia Bird

Mia Bird is a research fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California and serves on the faculty at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. Mia’s research focuses on criminal justice and health and human services policies. She is the Director of the PPIC-BSCC Multi-county Study, a data collection, linking, and evaluation effort designed to estimate the effects of criminal justice reforms on recidivism outcomes and identify best practices for recidivism-reduction at the local level. Mia also leads a project focused on the impacts of the Affordable Care Act on enrollment and recidivism outcomes for those involved with the criminal justice system. Her past work has covered topics such as the allocation of realignment funding, healthcare for the correctional population, and the use of data to improve policymaking. Mia holds a PhD in public policy, an MA in demography, and an MPP from the University of California, Berkeley.

Mark Courtney

Mark Courtney

Mark Courtney, PhD

Mark is a Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. He is a faculty affiliate of Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, where he served as Director from 2001 to 2006. Mark is an elected Fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare and is a Society for Social Work and Research Fellow. He received the 2010 Peter W. Forsythe Award for leadership in public child welfare from the National Association of Public Child Welfare Administrators and is currently a member of the Committee on Improving the Health, Safety, and Well-Being of Young Adults of the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. His fields of interest include child welfare policy and services, the connection between child welfare services and other institutions serving families living in poverty, the transition to adulthood for vulnerable populations, and the professionalization of social work. Before moving into academia, Mark worked in various capacities providing group home care to abused and neglected adolescents in California. He has served as a consultant to the federal government, state departments of social services, local public and private child welfare agencies, and the philanthropic community. Mark received his PhD, MSW and BA from the University of California at Berkeley. He also received an MA in Clinical Psychology from the John F. Kennedy University.

Megan Finno-Velasquez

Megan Finno-Velasquez

Megan Finno-Velasquez, PhD, MSW

Megan Finno-Velasquez, PhD, MSW, is an assistant professor in the School of Social Work at New Mexico State University in Albuquerque, NM. Dr. Finno-Velasquez completed her PhD in Social Work at USC in 2015, and spent the following year as post-doctoral fellow with USC and the CDN. Her research interests center broadly around Latino child well-being, community level maltreatment prevention strategies, and improving service system response to the needs of immigrant families at risk of child maltreatment. Dr. Finno-Velasquez’s current work examines potential reasons for geographic variations in maltreatment referrals in Southern California. She is also part of a team analyzing structured risk decision making data in the child protective services system in CA. Dr. Finno-Velasquez received her MSW from New Mexico Highlands University in 2007, and has a BS in Psychology and Spanish from the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign.

Jennifer Hook

Jennifer Hook

Jennifer Hook, PhD

Jennifer is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Southern California. Her research areas include gender, family demography, inequality, work-family, social policy, child welfare, and comparative sociology, focusing on how social contexts, particularly social policies and opportunities in the labor market, impact individuals and families. Her recent work examines the influence of country context on fathers' time with children, the division of household labor, and women's employment, as well as the impacts of state policy and practice on foster children's outcomes and the economic vulnerability of parents involved with the child welfare system. She has used administrative data to examine regional variation in child welfare practices and county-level legal representation on family reunification of parents and their children placed in foster care in Washington State. In a new project, she used linked administrative data on child welfare, economic services, and employment to examine parents' economic trajectories in relation to child welfare involvement, and the association between economic trajectories and family reunification. Her research has appeared in journals including the American Sociological Review, the American Journal of Sociology, and the European Sociological Review. She is coauthor of Gendered Tradeoffs: Family, Social Policy, and Economic Inequality in Twenty-One Countries (Russell Sage 2009). Jennifer Hook received her Ph.D. from the University of Washington.

Michael Hurlburt

Michael Hurlburt

Michael Hurlburt, PhD

Michael is an Associate Professor at USC’s School of Social Work. In addition to his position at USC, Michael maintains an affiliation with the Child and Adolescent Services Research Center (CASRC) at Rady Children's Hospital in San Diego, contributing to collaborative opportunities for research with faculty at CASRC. His areas of expertise include clinical practice patterns in community-based public mental health service settings for children and adolescents; implementation of evidence-based mental health interventions; and developmental risks and trajectories among children in contact with child welfare. He is recognized for his detailed micro-analytic practice studies that inform efforts to improve public mental health care and his methodological experience with analysis of large-scale, national data sets. Michael has received grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, including a career development award focused on practice research in public mental health settings. He actively leads one component of a large, ongoing NIMH-funded randomized trial examining approaches to implementation of a well-established parent training program (The Incredible Years) in multiple counties in California. He is currently the co-principal investigator of the Principal Research Core in an NIMH-funded Advanced Center for Intervention and Services Research (ACISR) at CASRC. His current work concentrates on using technologically-supported behavioral measurements to improve prediction and prevention of unplanned foster placement disruptions. Michael earned his PhD at the University of California, San Diego.

Bryn King

Bryn King

Bryn King, MSW, PhD

Bryn King, MSW, PhD is an Assistant Professor at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto and an Affiliated Researcher at the Children’s Data Network, University of Southern California and the California Child Welfare Indicators Project, University of California, Berkeley. She received her MSW from the Silver School of Social Work, New York University and her doctorate from the UC Berkeley School of Social Welfare. At the broadest level, Bryn’s research focuses on the well-being of older children and youth in the child welfare system, particularly those who spend time in foster care.

Hedwig Lee

Hedwig Lee

Hedwig Lee, PhD

Hedwig (Hedy) is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington in Seattle.She is broadly interested in the social determinants and consequences of population health and health disparities, with a particular focus on race/ethnicity, poverty, race-related stress, and the family. Hedy’s research draws from multiple sources of data to investigate these relationships.Her recent work examines the impact of family member incarceration on the health and attitudes of family members, association between discrimination and mental and physical health, documenting trends in racial/ethnic health disparities, socioeconomic causes and consequences of obesity in childhood and adolescence, and using social media data for demographic and health research.

Bridgette Lery

Bridgette Lery

Bridgette Lery, MSW, PhD

Bridgette leads research and evaluation for the San Francisco Human Services Agency. She uses administrative data to plan, implement, and understand the effects of child welfare and other human service interventions using a continuous quality improvement approach. Much of that work includes using linked data such as child welfare, homelessness, juvenile probation, mental health, and the U.S. census. Some current projects include, (1) an ACF-funded randomized controlled trial of housing and intensive services to homeless, child welfare involved families, (2) implementation and evaluation of Project 500, a cross-system anti-poverty program for families, (3) local planning and evaluation of interventions implemented under California’s Title IV-E Waiver Demonstration, and (3) co-leading an ACF-funded university partnership grant to train MSW students in the use of evidence for better decision making.

Joe Magruder

Joe Magruder

Joe Magruder, PhD

Joe is an associate specialist for the California Child Welfare Indicators Project. He is a social work researcher who specializes is analyzing longitudinal administrative data to understand children’s experience in the child welfare system. He is especially interested in the long-term effects of child welfare decisions on children’s lives. Joe joined the Child Welfare Indicators Project after working as a child welfare program specialist for the California Department of Social Services for several decades. He earned his PhD in Social Welfare from the University of California at Berkeley.

Ann Owens

Ann Owens

Ann Owens, PhD

Ann Owens is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at USC. Her areas of research include urban sociology, social stratification, sociology of education, quantitative methods, and social policy. Her current research focuses on the causes and consequences of inequalities in neighborhood and school contexts. Projects in progress include documenting trends, causes, and consequences of school segregation by income; the consequences of changes in assisted housing policy for neighborhood well-being; the causes of socioeconomic changes in majority-Hispanic neighborhoods; and the consequences of neighborhood inequality for educational attainment into young adulthood. She is a faculty affiliate of the Spatial Sciences Institute and the Population Research Center. Prior to joining the faculty at USC, Ann completed her PhD in Sociology & Social Policy at Harvard University and completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Stanford University.

Janet Schneiderman

Janet Schneiderman

Janet Schneiderman, PhD

Janet is a Research Associate Professor for USC’s School of Social Work. Previously, she worked for the USC Department of Nursing. She has partnered with the Community Assessment and Treatment Center at LAC+USC to evaluate health problems in children in the child welfare system and child welfare caregivers' barriers to accessing pediatric health care. In 2009, Janet was awarded a 5-year KO1 grant from the National Institutes of Health's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to study medical neglect of children in the child welfare system. Currently, she is assessing the role of caregivers, birth parents, and foster parents as they navigate the pediatric health care system to obtain needed health services. Janet has also received a USC Urban Initiative grant with the USC School of Dentistry to evaluate oral health and the effect of wraparound services on adherence to follow-up care for adults with developmental disabilities. Her additional research interests include: child maltreatment; the role of case management in health and human services; the relationship of health education to adherence; family health and well being; and culture and health. Janet received her PhD from the University of Southern California.

Dorian Traube

Dorian Traube

Dorian Traube, PhD

Dorian is an Associate Professor and Associate Dean of Faculty Affairs at USC’s School of Social Work. Her research agenda focuses on the behavioral health of high-risk adolescents. Traube's research is theory-driven and results in strategies for promoting behavioral and social functioning for high-risk populations of youth between the ages of 13 and 24.She has made scholarly contributions in three topic areas that assist in translating models of behavioral risk across high-risk adolescent populations: behavioral health of adolescents affected by AIDS; behavioral health of young men who have sex with men; and behavioral health of child welfare-involved adolescents. In establishing that models of behavioral risk can be translated across various high-risk adolescent populations, Traube hopes to create adolescent behavioral health prevention interventions that can be delivered to multiple at-risk populations. She is currently the principal investigator of a National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded R01 to determine the prevalence and impact of substance use, predictors of substance abuse over the course of adolescent development, and the role that current child welfare services play in ameliorating substance use and abuse. She is also funded by the Southern California Clinical and Translational Science Institute to validate two mental health screening tools currently used by the Los Angeles County departments of Mental Health and Children and Family Services to screen children in foster care for mental health needs. Traube received her doctorate in social work from Columbia University.

Daniel Webster

Daniel Webster

Daniel Webster, PhD

Daniel is Principal investigator of the California Child Welfare Indicators Project at UC Berkeley. Daniel has provided technical assistance for the past decade in the understanding and use of longitudinal data to promote system improvement to public child welfare agencies in the states of Alaska, California, Florida, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. He is also currently the evaluation liaison for the California grantee (California Partners for Permanency) of the Federal Permanency Innovations Initiative to reduce long-term foster care and he regularly co-instructs courses through the Regional Training Academies on the application of advanced analytics for public child welfare administrators from state and county agencies. Daniel earned his PhD in Social Welfare from the University of California at Berkeley.

Christopher Wildeman

Christopher Wildeman

Christopher Wildeman, PhD

Christopher is an Associate Professor of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University’s College of Human Ecology and a faculty fellow at the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, the Center for the Study of Inequality, Court-Key-Bauer Hall, and the Cornell Population Center. Prior to joining Cornell’s faculty, Christopher was an Associate Professor of Sociology at Yale University and a faculty fellow at the Center for Research on Inequalities and the Life Course and the Institution for Social and Policy Studies. Since 2013, he has been a visiting fellow at the Bureau of Justice Statistics. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology and Demography from Princeton University in 2008. From 2008-2010, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar and postdoctoral affiliate in the Population Studies Center (PSC) at the University of Michigan. His research and teaching interests revolve around the consequences of mass imprisonment for inequality, with emphasis on families, health, and children. He is also interested in child welfare more broadly, especially as relates to child maltreatment and the foster care system. He was the 2013 recipient of the Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award from the American Society of Criminology.

"Discovery consists of seeing what everyone has seen and thinking what no one has thought."
Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, 1937
1150 South Olive Street, Suite 1400
Los Angeles, CA 90015
General Questions
Connect
Newsletter
Sign up for our mailing list to stay up to date with the Children's Data Network's latest research and news developments.
©2017 Datanetwork.org
Designed by House Helios