Connecting the Dots: 2017 Snapshots of Child Well-Being in Los Angeles County

Birth trends and family demographics across Los Angeles County: How they are changing and why it matters

  • Birth record data from 2002-2012 (the latest decade available) show a substantial drop in numbers and rates of births across L.A. County. Of the births that occurred, the majority were in the San Gabriel and San Fernando Valleys, and in the South L.A. region.
  • Births to white and Latina mothers decreased countywide by 33% and 19%, respectively, while births to Chinese women rose 146% - this increase was most dramatic in the San Gabriel Valley.
  • Births to women with college degrees increased for the county as a whole, but not in the Metro, South, and East L.A. areas, or in the Antelope Valley.

Why do these trends matter? Understanding demographic trends is critical for planning services and systems to meet the changing needs of children and families. Historic service distribution patterns across the county may need to change to meet shifting demographic conditions. Communities with the largest concentrations of young children need the infrastructure and resources to support these families. Decades of research show investments in young children and families pay off. Assuring a healthy start for children should be one of the highest priorities for our county - our future literally depends on it.

MAP KEY:

  • 0 to -4%

  • -5 to -9%

  • -10 to -14%

  • -15 to -19%

  • -20 to -24%

VIEWING MAP: VIEWING MAP:
Percentage Change in General Fertility Rates from 2002 to 2012, by Service Planning Area (SPA) and Supervisorial District (SD) in L.A. County.

VIEW DATA BY:

Service Planning Area (SPA)

Supervisorial District (SD)

MAP KEY:

  • 0 to -4%

  • -5 to -9%

  • -10 to -14%

  • -15 to -19%

  • -20 to -24%

Introduction

Birth Trends By Region

Demographics and Socioeconomics of Infants and Their Families

Implications

Acknowledgments

  • DOWNLOAD:

About the Project

This snapshot is part of the ongoing "Connecting the Dots" series by the Children's Data Network at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work. Connecting the Dots snapshots bring together data and stories to provide new insights about the health and well-being of children and families in L.A. County. The series also highlights the great work happening throughout the county.

This is the first of four snapshots to be released in 2017, drawing on data from birth records to examine regional differences within L.A. County. This snapshot provides an overview of infant and family demographic trends as a foundation for the next three snapshots, which will explore specific indicators of healthy birth outcomes, such as receipt of timely prenatal care.

To learn more about this project and the Children’s Data Network, please visit http://www.datanetwork.org/snapshots/

Map Data Notes:

Data Definition: Percentage change in General Fertility Rate—number of births per 1,000 women ages 15-49—from 2002 to 2012, by Service Planning Area (SPA) and Supervisorial District (SD) in Los Angeles County.

Source: Vital Records, 2002-2012. Analysis by the Children’s Data Network at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work, University of Southern California. Population estimates for denominators retrieved from the California Department of Finance (http://www.dof.ca.gov/Forecasting/Demographics/Estimates/) and U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey (https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml). Zip code estimates calculated by the Geospatial Sciences Institute at the Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

Footnotes: Changes in fertility rates between 2002 and 2012 were statistically significant for L.A. County, all Supervisorial Districts, and all SPAs except 1 and 5. Population denominators for women ages 15-49 in each geographic area are synthetic zip code estimates based on city estimates from the California Department of Finance and U.S. Census Bureau.

Released March 2017